NEWS & EVENTS

INVASIVE AND NATIVE SPECIES

We hear a lot about invasive insects like the Spotted Lantern Fly and Emerald Ash Borer that decimate (or have the potential to) trees in native and agricultural habitats. As we have learned in part of our Environmental Educational Series, invasive plants can be just as destructive to our native ecosystems. Fall is the time where a lot of these plants are setting fruit and seed. When birds and other critters eat these seeds and fruits they spread and invade natural, agricultural, and residential areas. This on its surface may not seem like a scenario that is all that bad, but when you consider all the pesticides and tax payer dollars that go into eradicating these weeds and other plants, the issue becomes a little more clear. Tree of heaven (host plant of Spotted Lantern Fly), multiflora rose, burning bush, Japanese barberry, Russian and autumn olive are just a few of the invasive species that are setting fruit now and thus spread by wildlife at this time. If you see these plants growing in your property, steps can be taken to reduce spread – removal or pruning/cutting back to remove flowers/fruit.

This is also a time to consider some fall planting with native plants that are perfect for birds and pollinators!

Yarrow, bee balm, milk weeds, phlox, black eyed susan, coneflower, aster, goldenrod, foam flower, joe pye weed, tickseed, sunflower, beard tongue, columbine, gayfeather, serviceberry, blueberry, snakeroot, paw paw, button bush, new jersey tea, redbud, flowering dogwood, spicebush, summer sweet, and coral honeysuckle are good choices.

Be sure to meet with us every 4th Monday to discuss the environmental issues that are concerning you in our township, state, and beyond!

BIRD HABITAT RECOGNITION PROGRAM

Engaging in sustainable landscaping will increase your chances of encountering the wonders of nature on a daily basis. Registering your property with Audubon Pennsylvania will ensure that you get up-to-the-minute information on events in your region and opportunities to interact with experts and like-minded landowners around the state. It’s free to register. Adding a yard sign will pique the interest of your neighbors! Contact us for more information: conservationpa@audubon.org

2020 Census Information

The BCPC has created a web portal for information and resources related to the upcoming April 2020 Census – https://2020census-bucksgis.opendata.arcgis.com

We encourage all residents to take time to learn about the 2020 Census. In addition there is also a link to Census Jobs. The US Census Bureau will be hiring thousands of people across the country so this is also a great resource for those seeking employment. More information can be found at www.2020census.gov

 

Open Burning Information

Looking for information about Warminster Township Open Burning Ordinance?
Take a look at the Open Fire Information Sheet
Remember, you can always find all Township ordinances at https://www.ecode360.com/WA2486

For questions, please contact Department of Emergency Management & Services at (267) 317-1313

2018 Fire & EMS Response Data

Every wonder how many how many calls the Warminster Fire Department, Hartsville Fire Company and Central Bucks EMS handle in a given year! Now you can find out by reading the Emergency Management and Services 2018 report (click here). The report will show you how great of a job our volunteer fire companies are doing, along with Central Bucks EMS.

 

The Great Backyard Bird Count

The Great Backyard Bird Count is just around the corner—so take a few minutes to brush up on some of the birds you’re most likely to spot.

Whether you’re a beginner getting set to take part in this year’s count, or you simply want to know more about the birds you see on the regular, check out these helpful tips for IDing 15 common species. You’ll enjoy learning new facts about some familiar friends. And you’ll be ready when the GBBC count starts on Friday, February 15.  Click here for detials.

Spotted Lanternfly

Questions about the Spotted Lanternfly? Please refer to the chart. Residents are encouraged to help combat the spread of the spotted lanternfly by eliminating these non-native insects when possible. At this time of year, both adult spotted lanternflies and their egg masses can be found.  Please keep a look out and destroy these invaders whenever possible. Other tips can be found at https://extension.psu.edu/spotted-lanternfly. (pdf version)