INVASIVE AND NATIVE SPECIES

We hear a lot about invasive insects like the Spotted Lantern Fly and Emerald Ash Borer that decimate (or have the potential to) trees in native and agricultural habitats. As we have learned in part of our Environmental Educational Series, invasive plants can be just as destructive to our native ecosystems. Fall is the time where a lot of these plants are setting fruit and seed. When birds and other critters eat these seeds and fruits they spread and invade natural, agricultural, and residential areas. This on its surface may not seem like a scenario that is all that bad, but when you consider all the pesticides and tax payer dollars that go into eradicating these weeds and other plants, the issue becomes a little more clear. Tree of heaven (host plant of Spotted Lantern Fly), multiflora rose, burning bush, Japanese barberry, Russian and autumn olive are just a few of the invasive species that are setting fruit now and thus spread by wildlife at this time. If you see these plants growing in your property, steps can be taken to reduce spread – removal or pruning/cutting back to remove flowers/fruit.

This is also a time to consider some fall planting with native plants that are perfect for birds and pollinators!

Yarrow, bee balm, milk weeds, phlox, black eyed susan, coneflower, aster, goldenrod, foam flower, joe pye weed, tickseed, sunflower, beard tongue, columbine, gayfeather, serviceberry, blueberry, snakeroot, paw paw, button bush, new jersey tea, redbud, flowering dogwood, spicebush, summer sweet, and coral honeysuckle are good choices.

Be sure to meet with us every 4th Monday to discuss the environmental issues that are concerning you in our township, state, and beyond!

BIRD HABITAT RECOGNITION PROGRAM

Engaging in sustainable landscaping will increase your chances of encountering the wonders of nature on a daily basis. Registering your property with Audubon Pennsylvania will ensure that you get up-to-the-minute information on events in your region and opportunities to interact with experts and like-minded landowners around the state. It’s free to register. Adding a yard sign will pique the interest of your neighbors! Contact us for more information: conservationpa@audubon.org

What is the Christmas Bird Count?

The Christmas Bird Count (CBC) is a long-standing program of the National Audubon Society, with over 100 years of community science involvement. It is an early-winter
bird census, where thousands of volunteers across the U.S., Canada, and many countries in the Western Hemisphere go out over a 24-hour period on one calendar day to count birds. A map view of the circles expected to be included in the 119th CBC can be found here: https://audubon.maps.arcgis.com/apps/View/ index.html?appid=fadfb421e95f4949bde20c29a38228bd

If you’re interested in participating next season, check out the map to find a count near you; more circles will be added as they are approved. Green and yellow circles are open for new participants, and red circles are full. Please contact compilers by email using the information from the pop-ups on the map.

AN INVITATION FROM THE WARMINSTER ENVIRONMENTAL ADVISORY COUNCIL FOR YOU!

Please join the Warminster EAC in welcoming SPRING 2019 by tending a garden bed. The Community Garden at Szymanek Park needs gardeners for the coming spring. There is limited space and plots will be registered first come-first served. Warminster Community Garden Szymanek Park 200 East Street Road, Warminster Please contact townshipmanager@warminsterpa.org to get signed up now! Please express if your time will be used to earn volunteer credit, along with organization name.

**Not interested in gardening, but still wish to help? We welcome all volunteers to ready the Community Garden by aiding with repairs for the spring of 2019. Perfect for your Boy Scout or Girl Scout troop!!

Spotted Lanternfly Information

The Spotted Lanternfly is a new invasive insect that has spread throughout southeastern Pennsylvania since its discovery in Berks County in 2014. SLF presents a significant threat to Pennsylvania agriculture, including the grape, tree-fruit, hardwood and nursery industries. To learn about the Spotted Lanternfly, and what action you can take to stop the spread of this invasive insect that is threatening the northeastern United States, especially southeastern Pennsylvania, you can call the Penn State Extension hotline at 1-888-422-3359 with questions on spotted lanternfly management. For more information on how to identify, manage and report Spotted Lanternfly sightings, visit https://extension.psu.edu/spotted-lanternfly.